Tuesday, August 25, 2009

One Minute Stop Lane At airports

Airport one minute stop or drop lane for the passengers. This is used to avoid traffic blockage and cannot be used for parking or stay purp... thumbnail 1 summary

Airport one minute stop or drop lane for the passengers. This is used to avoid traffic blockage and cannot be used for parking or stay purpose. Just drop the luggage and passenger and get away otherwise you will face a fine from Police. So beware at one minute stop lane at airports.
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Sunday, August 23, 2009

Most expensive military aircrafts

B2 - Spirit: A heavy bomber made by USA, only 21 units were made and now only 20 remains as one crashed in 2008. B-2 Spirit is top our l... thumbnail 1 summary

B2 - Spirit:

A heavy bomber made by USA, only 21 units were made and now only 20 remains as one crashed in 2008. B-2 Spirit is top our list of most expensive as each unit cost around $2.4 billion, yeah quite an expensive bomber plane, but if you check the features of this aircraft, you will surely say that this aircraft is worthy of such a price tag. Let us give you brief overview of its capabilities,
  1. the THING is hard to detect via infrared,
  2. acoustic, electromagnetic,
  3. visual or radar signals
  4. virtualy invisible.
Thus giving it the stealth and nice capability making it able to attack targets with less fear of retaliation and more powerful and unbeatable military aircrafts. Its a new era of aviation technology

Test Video of B2 Spirit has also published

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Aviation Technology

Get a quick review about the advancing aviation technology! You may enjoy in the future more ease and more advancement thumbnail 1 summary

Get a quick review about the advancing aviation technology! You may enjoy in the

future more ease and more advancement

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Friday, August 21, 2009

RAMAZAN MUBARIK

The month of blessings, the jannat of every Muslim. Best of luck of health in ramdan. May your fast pass with best of health. With Best Reg... thumbnail 1 summary

The month of blessings, the jannat of every Muslim. Best of luck of health in ramdan. May your fast pass with best of health. With Best Regards, Ali Zain. www.promaxworld.com and from MAXNETS NETWORK TEAM.



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Boeing completes Required Navigation Performance procedure. They are performing milestone in city of Panama

Boeing had completed a critical design review for Required Navigation Performance procedures abbreviation RNP in work at Panama's Tocume... thumbnail 1 summary
Boeing had completed a critical design review for Required Navigation Performance procedures abbreviation RNP in work at Panama's Tocumen International Airport and Howard Airport.

Summary

The critical design review, which took place at the Copa Airlines training center in the city of Panama, assesses the "fly-ability" of the procedures and ensures compatibility with airline crew procedures. RNP uses global-positioning satellites and onboard flight-management systems to guide airplanes accurately along precise flight paths.

Boeing, along with its wholly owned subsidiary, Jeppesen, will provide RNP procedures under contract with the Autoridad Aeronautica Civil (AAC), Panama's Civil Aviation Authority. Boeing and Jeppesen worked very closely with the AAC of Panama and Copa Airlines to incorporate their requirements into the final RNP procedures that Jeppesen will use in creating the final navigation charts and corresponding navigational database. These procedures will support flights into the Panamanian airports for any airline, with Panama's Copa Airlines taking the lead in testing the RNP procedures. More precise routing can help aircraft operators reduce fuel consumption and lessen greenhouse gas emissions.

"Panama is constantly working to make our aviation infrastructure more secure and efficient," said Capt. Rafael Barcenas, Panama's Civil Aviation Authority director. "As a Panamanian I am proud to be part of this legacy of innovation. Together we are maximizing the use of new technology for the benefit of our airspace."

"As Panama implements advanced arrival procedures using RNP, Copa Airlines will be able to achieve even greater safety, reliability and efficiency in its operations at Tocumen airport," said David Lindskoog, Copa's vice president of Flight Operations. "RNP procedures will enable significant savings in flight time and fuel consumption by providing the most direct arrival routes to the runways."

In May, Boeing signed an agreement with the AAC to provide Required Navigation Performance procedures to the country as part of Panama's effort to set new standards for safe and efficient airline operations in Latin America.

"Boeing is proud to partner with the AAC of Panama and our friends at Copa Airlines to help with the first operational implementation of RNP in Panama," said Per Noren, director of Boeing Aviation Infrastructure for Commercial Airplanes. "This will provide an important benefit to Panama and help the AAC promote further expansion of RNP implementation in Latin America."

Saturday, August 15, 2009

Pulling A Plan Become Easy

Man is pulling a plan with a pulley, Nice video and enjoying,. He is pulling nearly 2.5 tons. Thats equal to nearly 2500KG. Too heavy but w... thumbnail 1 summary

Man is pulling a plan with a pulley, Nice video and enjoying,. He is pulling nearly 2.5 tons. Thats equal to nearly 2500KG. Too heavy but with just a force of 78N force. Thats a miracle of science and technology... Enjoy The video..

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Friday, August 14, 2009

Airport upgrades incoming

Mercer County's airport has been slated to receive more than $500,000 in federal funding for rehabilitate the facility's ... thumbnail 1 summary

Mercer County's airport has been slated to receive more than $500,000 in federal funding for rehabilitate the facility's runway and taxi - way lighting, Southern West-Virginia's representatives in Washington, D.C. said on Thursday.

Mercer County Airport will receive $509,648 through the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Airport Improvement Program.

"We've let the contract for it," said Charlie Peters, president of the Mercer County Airport Authority. The system to be installed will flash different colors of lights to signal to approaching pilots whether they are too high or too low over the runway.

"It's pretty sophisticated," Peters said. "Of course, we're completing those 300 foot extensions on the runway. That's moving along."

Safety zones at both ends of the runway will help airplanes stop if they overshoot it while landing. Soft soil will help bring the planes to a halt; they are similar in concept to the runway truck ramps seen on the downhill grades of some major highways.

"This is a very positive development for Mercer County and the surrounding area," said U.S. Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-W.Va., chairman of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. "This money will support a capacity project that will improve the efficiency of the National Airspace System, promote commerce in West Virginia, and improve the economy."

"Air travel is an essential component of the transportation network of our state, and the Mercer County Airport will help ensure the safety of those who use the airport and expand opportunities there for the long-term," said U.S. Sen. Robert C. Byrd, D-W.Va.

U.S. Rep. Nick Rahall, D-W.Va. vice-chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, said, "Mercer County Airport provides an important hub of transportation in southern West Virginia, and I am glad to see funding coming back to our communities, reinvesting in this important infrastructure."

Wednesday, August 12, 2009

Ethiopian Airlines Reports Record Net Profit

Ethiopian Airlines Reports Record Net Profit At a press conference at Hilton Addis on Friday August 7, 2009. Ato Girma Wake, CEO of Ethi... thumbnail 1 summary


Ethiopian Airlines Reports Record Net Profit

At a press conference at Hilton Addis on Friday August 7, 2009. Ato Girma Wake, CEO of Ethiopian Airlines revealed that the company has achieved a remarkable record of high financial performance for the fiscal year 2008/2009. The achievement is unmatched to any past performance results in the history of the Airline.

According to the financial reports released at the Conference, Ethiopian generated 12.2 billion birr in operating revenue during the said budget year, a 32.8% increase over the previous year. For the period in review and for the first time ever, the national carrier realized a net profit of 1,345 million birr, representing a whopping increase of 165%.

Ethiopian transported 2.8 million passengers during the year in review, registering an increase of 12.3% over the results of the previous year. The substantial growth in revenue and the resultant operating and net profits are, among other factors, directly attributed to the apparent growth of traffic.

There has also been continued expansion of cargo services. During the period in review, Ethiopian hauled 101 thousand tons of cargo, 38.4% more than that transported in the previous year. Ethiopian’s cargo provides vital services to our customers who are in the business of exports and imports. This is yet another unique and pioneering endeavor by the national airline to primarily encourage and promote Africa’s export trade to Europe, the Middle East and Asia. No other airline in Africa avails cargo services of such dimension and magnitude.

According to Ato Girma, the CEO, “The overall performance of the airline is noteworthy and rewarding considering the numerous challenges we have had to cope with during the year, the major ones of which are, cut throat competition in the industry, global economic crisis, escalating operational and capital costs led by the less than predictable and fluid gyration of fuel prices and the shrinking trends of the market environment.”

Determined to sustain the momentum and in line with its vision 2010 and beyond, Ethiopian has recently placed firm orders for the acquisition of five B777-200LRs from the Boeing Company, and twelve A350-900s from Airbus valued at a total of 4.2 billion US dollars. This new purchase will bring the total number of airplanes on order to 35 including the ten B787s previously purchased from Boeing and eight Q400 turboprops from Bombardier. Ethiopian Airlines is the first African carrier to order and operate the ultra-long range B777-200LR. The 777-200LR is the only airplane in the world that offers the range and efficiency Ethiopian needs to serve long-haul markets and further position Addis Ababa as a strategic hub for Africa. The A350-900 has the widest fuselage in its category, offering unprecedented levels of customer comfort, the lowest operating costs and lower seat-mile cost of any aircraft in this market segment. It is designed to confront the challenges of high fuel prices, rising passenger expectations and environmental constraints.

Ato Girma concluded his presentation by asserting that, “Ethiopian Airlines remains focused on its Vision 2010 and is very optimistic to reach and realize its defined objectives sooner than the end of the current budget year”.

About Ethiopian Airlines

In August 2008, Ethiopian won the 2008 Corporate Achievement Award of Aviation & Allied Business for setting the pace towards the development and growth of the African aviation industry. Ethiopian airline is becoming one of the largest airline service in Africa.

Ethiopian is also the first African carrier to win the 2008 Brussels Airport Company Award in recognition of its distinguished long haul operations witnessed through the introduction of new routes, new products, and close cooperation with Brussels Airport in marketing activities.

Ethiopian was the winner of the ‘2008 Best Airline in Africa Award’ at the African Travel Award in Lagos, Nigeria, for its excellent network and convenient connections in Africa.

In July 2009 Ethiopian won ‘Airline of the Year 2009’ award at African Business Award organized by the London based African Business Magazine and Common Wealth Business Council.

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Monday, August 10, 2009

Inside & Outside Cockpit View and HONG KONG international Airport

Inside and outside view of Boeing 747's cockpit, landing on world best airport hong kong international airport, which is located on a la... thumbnail 1 summary

Inside and outside view of Boeing 747's cockpit, landing on world best airport hong kong international airport, which is located on a large paradise having beautiful and amazing structure of airport...

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Sunday, August 9, 2009

Travlling without Oil !!!!

Now air planes and air crafts will fly with out OIL, thats may change our world, thats extremely be a wonderful enhancement and advancement.... thumbnail 1 summary
Now air planes and air crafts will fly with out OIL, thats may change our world, thats extremely be a wonderful enhancement and advancement.

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Saturday, August 8, 2009

How Airport Security Works

Terrorism has been a problem for airlines and air travelers since the 1970s, when hijackings and bombings became the method of choice for su... thumbnail 1 summary
Terrorism has been a problem for airlines and air travelers since the 1970s, when hijackings and bombings became the method of choice for subversive, militant organizations around the world. Although security at airports has always been tight, the 9/11 attacks woke many people up to a harsh reality -- it wasn't tight enough.

­
Millions of people fly on thousands of planes every day.

On that day, men armed with simple box cutters took over four passenger jets and used them as flying bombs. What security measures might have stopped them? How has airport security changed since then? According to the Department of Homeland Security, 730 million people travel on passenger jets every year, while more than 700 million pieces of their baggage are screened­ for explosives and other dangerous items. In this article, we'll find out how high-tech solutions are being used to make flying as safe as possible -- and we'll also consider if what we are doing is enough.

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Flying Circus takes off at the Butler County Airport this weekend

HAMILTON — Until you’ve been to the Flying Circus, you can’t get a good feel for the excitement it generates, says Mark Feist, president of... thumbnail 1 summary

HAMILTON — Until you’ve been to the Flying Circus, you can’t get a good feel for the excitement it generates, says Mark Feist, president of the Greater Cincinnati Radio Control Club.

The 49th edition of the GCRCC takes place Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 8-9, at the Butler County Regional Airport.

“Like most years, we’ll have over 20 different events that range from sport airplane demonstrations up to turbine-powered jets that reach speeds of over 200 miles per hour,” Feist said.

The Greater Cincinnati Radio Control Club is a group of model airplane enthusiasts with a flying field on Woodsdale Road near Trenton.

The Flying Circus will not only feature a variety of airplanes with wingspans from a foot to 10 feet but also helicopters and novelty vehicles. One is a flying doghouse with Snoopy in a dogfight with the Red Baron (who will be flying a blue airplane this year). See Harry Potter flying on his broomstick, making his seventh appearance at the annual event, and what seem to be remote-control cars taking a lap on the runway until they seem to magically fly through the air.

“We will have three racing events this year,” Feist said, “including a re-enactment of the Golden Age Races that made pilots like Roscoe Turner and Billy Metcalf famous, and a re-enactment of the annual Reno International Air Race.”

The Flying Circus also is noted for its World War II re-enactments, featuring pyrotechnic displays provided by Rozzi’s Famous Fireworks. New this year will be the portrayal of the bombing of Pearl Harbor along with revivals of Doolittle’s Raid over Tokyo and the Normandy invasion.

“We’ll have a re-enactment of the B-29 ending the war,” Feist said. In other words, the Flying Circus is going to drop the Big One.

The club’s pilots also will compete in skill events such as the popular Balloon Bust.

“We create a ‘rock wall’ out of Styrofoam and have helium balloons tied to it that pilots try to bust with their planes,” Feist said. “Later in the show, we make them fly upside down and do it.”

The latter will be good for those coming to see a crash.

“At our trials last week, 14 planes went up and three landed safely,” he said. “Everybody loves a good crash.”

The grand finale (pending cooperation of the equipment) will be the traditional launching of the space shuttle, which takes off on a rocket 2,000 feet in the air and then glides to a landing.

“We’ll have a total of 150 airplanes flying in the four-hour show,” Feist said.

For those who find themselves falling in love with the radio-controlled aircraft, the club and several hobby shops will have booths with information and items for sale. The club will raffle off equipment and memberships.

“We have instructional programs to teach people how to fly,” Feist said, noting that the club offers three sessions per week when the field is shut down except for training.

Also, people who come early or stay late can take advantage of some of the private full-size airplanes at the airport and take real rides.

Contact this reporter at (513) 820-2188

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Landing system back at airport

MARTINSBURG - After nearly a two-year absence because of runway construction, the Eastern West Virginia Regional Airport's instrument la... thumbnail 1 summary

MARTINSBURG - After nearly a two-year absence because of runway construction, the Eastern West Virginia Regional Airport's instrument landing system is now back.

That's important because it makes the airport more functional and could potentially increase the number of planes that land there, said Airport Manager Bill Walkup.

"We're talking about the instrument landing system for the prime runway, which is a series of antennas that allows a pilot and an airplane to land during inclement weather, when visibility and conditions are poor," Walkup said, speaking before Wednesday's monthly Airport Authority meeting.

"The system's been out of service for about two years due to the fact that we've had pieces of runway, pieces of the system itself missing, and we've also had large obstructions, mounds of dirt due to construction of the runway," he said. "But probably within the last three weeks, things have come back just about completely to normal and we're tweaking all the equipment."

Although the Federal Aviation Authority owns the antennas, it's the airport's responsibility to maintain the clear areas that go with the system, Walkup said.

Soon, the FAA will take the next step to inspect the airport's work, he said.

"The FAA will fly in an airplane with special instruments and test fly that system several times. They will then certify it is functional," Walkup said.

Walkup expects that to happen within 10 days to two weeks, according to a notice that he's already received from federal officials.

This improvement should increase the airport traffic by an estimated 12 to 15 percent, he said.

"In other words, that percentage of airplanes, especially corporate airplanes going up and down the Atlantic Coast, if they plug us in for a fuel stop or for whatever reason and they see that that instrument landing system is out of service - which they will see in the FAA system - they'll take us out of the equation and go to another field where they know they can make it during bad weather," Walkup said.

"But now we're going to be plugged back into the system, which is a big plus," he said.

Prior to the beginning of construction in early 2005, the airport had a combined operation - including both civilian and military -of 60,000 annually, Walkup said.

An operation is a take off, a landing or a touch-and-go, he said. "Basically it's something that uses the runway."

He said the number "dropped to well below 20,000 during the construction period," and he isn't sure what that amount will be once everything is back in operation.

Authority Chairman Rick Wachtel said he's eager for the airport's instrumentation to be "back up to speed" and agreed that this is an important step forward.

"When it was out, it was possible that some would avoid us. But with our instrumentation back up to full strength, they're more likely to come in, have lunch or refuel and use the services here. So it is definitely good for us," Wachtel said.

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