Tuesday, December 1, 2009

HAMBANTOTA Airport {Fueled} By Political activities

Hambantota Airport Fueled By Politics The following article lists some simple, informative tips that will help you have a better experienc... thumbnail 1 summary
Hambantota Airport Fueled By Politics

The following article lists some simple, informative tips that will help you have a better experience with aviation, airport.



It seems like new information is discovered about something every day. And the topic of aviation, airport is no exception. Keep reading to get more fresh news about aviation, airport.

On Friday (27) President Mahinda Rajapaksa laid the foundation stone for a new USD $200 million international airport in Hambantota. The government says that the airport is necessary as a second gateway to Sri Lanka and as an alternate airport for aircraft arriving at Katunayake International Airport, but some aviation professionals see the Hambantota airport as a wasteful political gimmick rather than a well-considered infrastructure project.

This is the third attempt to build a second international  airport for the island. The UNP tried to build one in the Kuda Oya area, but lost power before the plans could come to fruition. Then the UPFA administration decided to expand the existing Weerawila airport, only to face stiff resistance from the environmental authority (the airport was close to a bird sanctuary) and opposition from area farmers (the airport would consume rich farm land used for paddy cultivation). Now the airport is scheduled to be constructed in Mattala, which will require clearing 2,000 hectares of natural forest cover and shrub land.

“Flying in Sri Lanka is an absolute nightmare,” said one Sri Lankan pilot, who wished to remain anonymous for fear of reprisals.  “It’s a huge hassle to get to the airport. All the general aviation training has been shifted to small airfields south of Colombo. These airfields are not suitable for training — they do not have adequate runway lights. With all these problems I don’t know why they’re trying to build a 200 million dollar airport. The government should improve the other airfields first.”

A designated alternate airport

According to international regulatory requirements, all  airports must have a designated alternate airport in the event that a landing at the original airport is impossible due to bad weather conditions, an obstructed landing strip, or the closure of the airport. Presently, the alternate for Katunayake is Trivandrum Airport in South India, which is around 190 nautical miles and 20 minutes away. Many people do not understand that having an alternate airport close to the original destination, as in the case of Mattala, is not very practical, because the weather at the alternate airport will be similar to the original airport.

Government officials rejected these criticisms, claiming that a second international airport would be good for the aviation industry and for the Southern Province.

“The new airport is necessary for a number of reasons,  said Parakrama Dissanayake, Director of Aeronautical Services for the Civil Aviation Authority of Sri Lanka. “We don’t have an alternate airstrip for the country. We had an accident in 2004 when a cargo aircraft crashed near Katunayake airport. Had there been another airport the plane wouldn’t have crashed that day. The airport will also facilitate the airline industry because now all airplanes must carry enough fuel to go to an airport in India or Male. So if there’s a closer airport they won’t have to carry so much fuel.”

However, statistics  and historical data show that aircraft arriving at Katunayake have diverted on very few occasions due to weather. More often, planes have diverted due to LTTE attacks, which were made possible by the failure of the Sri Lanka Air Force to provide adequate security to the airfield. The poor security resulted in airport closures, including a night curfew.

Systematically destroyed

Aviation  in Sri Lanka has been systematically destroyed by the very authorities that regulate it.  The Civil Aviation Authority and the Sri Lanka Air Force have restricted general aviation so heavily that only a handful of aircraft can operate in the country. Even after winning the war the authorities have been shy to approve the import of aircraft. This has had serious and irreparable effects on the aviation industry and on career opportunities in aviation. At present, many student pilots opt to fly in the United States because they get more experience and time at a lower cost than in Sri Lanka. This represents a serious loss of foreign exchange to the country.

Sri  Lanka has 14 airfields distributed strategically around the island. These airfields were built by the British and managed by the Civil Aviation Authority in accordance with International Civil Aviation Organisational Standards. At the inception of the ethnic conflict the airfields were taken over by the Sri Lanka Air Force, which lacked the knowledge and ability to meet these civil aviation standards.

“Due to the security situation the Air Force stifled general aviation, and the country paid the price for it,” the Sri Lankan pilot said. “But even with peace they have not loosened the restrictions. Civil aviation should be handed over to the Civil Aviation Authority. Now the jurisdiction is with the Air Force and they are not a competent authority. None of the other ministries have any idea how to manage civil aviation.”

The  country’s maintenance capabilities and technical expertise are concentrated in SriLankan Airlines, which itself is limited by a shortage of trained personnel.  The pilot alleged that the aviation industry has been choked by a group of incompetent officials more focused on keeping their jobs than in providing proper policy recommendations to the government.

Refurbish existing airfields

Instead of wasting $200 million on a new airport, the pilot  said that the government should upgrade the Instrument Landing System (ILS) at Katunayake, develop and refurbish existing airfields and install proper navigational facilities. Upgrading existing airfields at Ratmalana, Weerawila, Jaffna and Trincomalee to regional airports will serve both the people and the tourism industry. An airport must have support infrastructure: roads, hotels and services. Just because Hambantota has a port does not mean that people will fly there. After all, this is one of the poorest regions of Sri Lanka with the lowest per capita income.

Civil  Aviation Authority official Dissanayake said the government chose to build the airport in Hambantota to stimulate growth in the south.

“The government has a plan to develop the southern region,” he said. “It will create jobs and growth near Hambantota,  both inside and outside the aviation industry. People want this airport; there is no doubt about it.” But why not expand the existing airport at Ratmalana? “There are a couple of constraints for expansion at Ratmalana because of the population density and the obstructions around the airport. It could be developed, but priority was given to Hambantota.”

So it seems that the government is determined to spend USD $200 million of the people’s money on a single mega project. Politicians of developing countries use these mega projects to impress their people, knowing that they will be long gone by the time people realise the damage it has caused. Although the Chinese government will fund this project, nothing comes free: have we forgotten about the destruction of 2,000 hectares of shrub land?

Despite the government’s reassurances, many Sri Lankans continue to believe that the Hambantota airport is fueled by politics, not necessity. The only people likely to benefit from this financial sinkhole are the politicians who pushed it through and the contractors hired to build it. As for the five-hour driving time between the airport and Colombo, Dissanayake has one message: Get used to it.

“When mobile phones were introduced to Sri Lanka in the 1990s, people said that nobody would buy  them,” he said. “Now, everyone owns one. It will be the same with the airport.”

Perhaps Dissanayake believes that, just as mobile phones became more affordable over time, the Hambantota airport will move closer to Colombo as it becomes more popular! With this kind of thinking, it’s no wonder that aviation experts are skeptical about the government’s intentions. The government’s logic seems to be “if you build it, they will come.” Only history can judge whether it is right or wrong.

Now you can be a confident expert on aviation, airport. OK, maybe not an expert. But you should have something to bring to the table next time you join a discussion on aviation, airport.

Bookmark and Share

Friday, November 27, 2009

Pakistan Made First Fighter Jet JF 17 with the help of China

Pakistan Made a military air craft with the help of China, JF 17 A powerful and amazing air crafts which is totally unbeatable in his perfor... thumbnail 1 summary
Pakistan Made a military air craft with the help of China, JF 17 A powerful and amazing air crafts which is totally unbeatable in his performance, timing, target and working.

DIMENSIONS











Length Overall
Height Overall
Wingspan

14 m
5.1 m
9 m

WEIGHTS AND FUEL

Empty Weight
Normal Take-Off Weight
Max Take-Off Weight
Max External Store Weight
Internal Fuel Weight

6,320 kg
9,100 kg
12,700 kg
3,720 kg
2,300 kg

PERFORMANCE

Max Speed
Service Ceiling
Operational Radius
Ferry Range
Take-Off Run
Landing Run
T/W Ratio
G Limit

M 1.6-1.8
16,700 m
1,350 km
3,000 km
~500 m
~700 m
0.95
+8.5/-3



The following article covers a topic that has recently moved to center stage--at least it seems that way. If you've been thinking you need to know more about it, here's your opportunity.



If you don't have accurate details regarding JF 17, then you might make a bad choice on the subject. Don't let that happen: keep reading.

ENGINE

JF-17/FC-1 will be powered by One Russian Made Klimov RD-93 Turbofan engine.

RD-93 has been developed by Klimov Design Bureau in St. Petersburg. It is a variant of Klimov RD-33 Turbofan Engine which powers the MIG-29 Fulcrum. The most significant difference being the repositioning of the gearbox along the bottom of the engine casing.



RD-33
Thrust (Afterburner): 8300 kgf /18,260 lb
Thrust: 5040 kgf / 11,090 lb
Specific Fuel Consumption: 2.1 kg/kgf/Hr in afterburner, 0.77 military
Bypass Ratio: 0.46
Compressor Pressure Ratio: 21
Maximum Turbine Inlet Temperature: 1680 K
Service Life, hr: 4000
Length: 4.230m
Maximum Diameter: 1.040m
Mass: 1055 kg


There have been some problems. The engine was emitting black smoke, which makes it easier for the enemy pilot to spot the plane. This puts the pilot in inferior position during a dogfight. It is not clear whether the fuel or the engine was responsible for the smoke and the issue has been resolved.


Smokey nature of the engine


The contract between China and Russia over re-exporting the engines to Pakistan has ran into dispute. Russia is sending mixed signals whether the issue has been resolved or not. The issue is mainly political because Russia has never sold advanced weaponry or its components to Pakistan due to the regional politics. Russia is also saying that FC-1s fitted with RD-93 are not allowed to compete where Russian Aircraft are competing.

China is also working on an indigenous engine which has the potential to power the FC-1 in future.


Now you can be a confident expert on JF 17. OK, maybe not an expert. But you should have something to bring to the table next time you join a discussion on JF 17.
JF-17 News Report: A News Report by Pakistan Television on JF-17.
DOWNLOAD - 8.52 MB, Requires Real Player or Real Alternative. (Credits: Pakistanidefence.com / PTV )
JF-17 Music Video: A video with several JF-17 photos and Song Aagay hi aagay By Karavan.
DOWNLOAD - 4.7 MB, Requires Windows Media Player 9 or above. (Credits: Shah Khan-Media Works, Pakdef.info)



Bookmark and Share

Hero pilot Hal Graham’s hard fall to earth

Hero pilot Hal Graham’s hard fall to earth The following article covers a topic that has recently moved to center stage--at least it seems... thumbnail 1 summary
Hero pilot Hal Graham’s hard fall to earth

The following article covers a topic that has recently moved to center stage--at least it seems that way. If you've been thinking you need to know more about it, here's your opportunity.



If you base what you do on inaccurate information, you might be unpleasantly surprised by the consequences. Make sure you get the whole aviation, aircrafts, pilot story from informed sources.

On a chilly Halloween afternoon, a group of about 70 people huddled outside an aluminum hangar at Crossville Memorial Airport, a tiny airstrip some 70 miles west of Knoxville. They had come to honor the life of a 75-year-old charter pilot named Hal Graham, and to make sense of his sudden and shocking end. They stuffed their cold hands into coat pockets and looked upward, away from earth.

As they watched, three airplanes took shape against the autumn sky. As the planes came closer, the people below made note of their flight pattern: a loose, triangular formation. It's the lead-up to the missing-man formation Air Force fighter jocks use to honor a fallen comrade, a sight that gives chills when performed by F-16s screaming across a field of blue.

This, by contrast, was three small twin-prop planes on a field of gray. Their motors were less a roar than a mournful drone.

The lead aircraft made a low pass over the runway and banked into an arcing 90-degree turn to the south. The other two lagged a quarter-mile behind on parallel headings and plodded west past the crowd. But Graham's fellow pilots didn't need jet engines to convey the weight of their mission. Down below, they could see Graham's own twin-prop plane, a honey: a fire-engine red '61 Piper Apache. It sat on the tarmac with its tires blocked, anchored to earth.

Fixed on its tail, though, was an iconic image of man's urge to conquer the skies: a helmeted warrior streaking skyward, propelled by the rocket strapped to his back.

The image of rocket jockeys soaring through space with rocket belts wrapped around their ribs went hand in hand with the space-race fervor of the 1960s. It had been lodged in the public consciousness ever since Buck Rogers blasted through the heavens in comic strips in the '20s. But the people huddled at the Crossville landing strip knew something the rest of the world had forgotten: a man had worn that belt and had felt the exaltation tasted by a relative handful of people in human history—the sensation of literally watching his feet lift from earth as the ground receded.

Buck Rogers was fake. Hal Graham was real.

Graham may have looked like just another aging small-town pilot. The people assembled in Crossville knew differently. Almost 50 years ago, Graham's face had graced the front page of The New York Times, when he had embodied the farthest-out hopes of American aeronautics. He had been the original test pilot for a propulsion system—a rocket belt—that permitted man short bursts of free flight. He thrilled high-ranking Pentagon officials with his deft handling, promising the kind of troop mobility they could only dream of.

Next to the aluminum trays of barbecue at the post-memorial gathering, there were pictures of Graham lifting off, landing before President John F. Kennedy and saluting him in a Life magazine spread. The fly-by marked an era when JFK challenged the nation to claim outer space as America's next frontier. With Graham as its symbol, American ingenuity would make the flight of Icarus more than a myth—only this Icarus wouldn't fall. He couldn't fall. He was a rocket man! Even today, rocket-belt enthusiasts around the world reverently refer to Graham as "His Eminence."

But the dream of this type of free flight eventually evaporated. Graham left the public eye for private life. Eventually he made a business out of flying and launched a single-pilot, single-plane operation. Shuttling passengers to remote airfields in his antique Piper, fellow pilots say, Graham was still a man transformed by flight—at once focused and free.

Some say age and illness had blunted his long-honed flying skills, forcing the Federal Aviation Administration to clip his wings. Others, such as a former employer, are more skeptical. They say Graham saw his livelihood savaged by a federal government that makes no allowances for aging airmen, no matter how stellar their safety record or their reputation. He was forced to surrender his airman certification to the FAA in October. And with it, friends say, went the cornerstone of his very identity.

On Oct. 22, Graham drove his '87 Dodge van from his home in Crab Orchard to the FAA Flight Standards District Office in Nashville near the airport. He arrived a little before 2 p.m. A cold front was on the way, but only a dimpled sheet of cloud filled the sky. He parked near the seven-story office building on Briley Parkway, the clouds and the trees mirrored in its copper-tinted windows, and strode into the lobby. The federal agency that had taken his pilot's license only two weeks earlier is located on the seventh floor.

He walked past a group of men sitting around a table, and past Suzie's Espresso, a wood-paneled coffee stand with its security gates down for the day. Inside, 20-year-old Emily Roy saw him pass out of the corner of her eye as she closed up shop. He was carrying a leather valise and wearing his familiar brown, brimmed hat. He stood in front of the elevators and pulled a pistol from the valise. With nothing left to say, he put the gun to his head.

Now you can be a confident expert on aviation, aircrafts, pilot. OK, maybe not an expert. But you should have something to bring to the table next time you join a discussion on aviation, aircrafts, pilot.

Bookmark and Share

Tuesday, November 24, 2009

This AirCraft Will EAT You!

This Aircraft will eat you! A new design of fighter air craft.. Which may eat you not by design but by its machine gun thumbnail 1 summary


Bookmark and Share

This Aircraft will eat you! A new design of fighter air craft.. Which may eat you not by design but by its machine gun

Friday, November 20, 2009

6 Army Plane In A Row

6 army planes ready to take off. These army planes give a negative and killing disadvantage of science. If they are not the part of this wo... thumbnail 1 summary

6 army planes ready to take off. These army planes give a negative and killing disadvantage of science. If they are not the part of this world. How we feel save and easy in our homes. But these are the sour reality of science and man to capture and kill other by this powers and destruction. They consume million tons of fuels and money for there maintain and plane drivers, if the same amount is used for humanity... The World Will Be Heaven.

Bookmark and Share

Thursday, November 19, 2009

A Crash fighter Jet.....

AFighter Jet get crashed in a lush greeny Area. It is looking a part of that garden... What do you think! ;) thumbnail 1 summary
AFighter Jet get crashed in a lush greeny Area. It is looking a part of that garden... What do you think! ;)


Bookmark and Share

Tuesday, November 17, 2009

F 16 On runway Wallpaper

Wow! An F 16 on runway landing loaded with 50 tons of bombs on both wings and a large tank of fuel.... ready to attack the enemy! with its ... thumbnail 1 summary

Wow! An F 16 on runway landing loaded with 50 tons of bombs on both wings and a large tank of fuel.... ready to attack the enemy! with its speed and power. No one can beat it! A Challenge. Click to view a larger image


Bookmark and Share

Sunday, November 15, 2009

Army Plane Firing Wallpaper

Here Army Plane is firing and looking in a great rage.... I think it is firing 8 MISSILES OR Fires at a same time... Causing Only polution ... thumbnail 1 summary

Here Army Plane is firing and looking in a great rage.... I think it is firing 8 MISSILES OR Fires at a same time... Causing Only polution and destruction

Bookmark and Share

Saturday, November 7, 2009

Aviation Training In Mobile, A new ERA

MOBILE, Alabama - The roar of a helicopter is part of an average morning at the Aviation Training Center, or ATC. All coast guard pilots e... thumbnail 1 summary

MOBILE, Alabama - The roar of a helicopter is part of an average morning at the Aviation Training Center, or ATC. All coast guard pilots eventually get some sort of instruction here.

“It's pretty intense, it requires full concentration for successful completion it definitely takes a lot of mental energy along with physical dexterity,” says Pilot Lieutenant Peter Igoe. He let me ride along for a short patrol around the Mobile area.

“Typically patrol the critical infrastructure of mobile along with the greater Gulf of Mexico,” says Igoe. Sector Mobile calls on planes from the aviation training center in an emergency--but the base also functions as the training ground for pilots to learn how to fly the Coast Guard way.

“Ours is a more humanitarian focus so the emphasis here is on safe flying,” says another Pilot, Lt. Eric Wilson. For the Coast Guard, Mobile is the obvious choice for the Aviation Training Center mostly because of the climate.

“The amount of training days we can get accomplished here because in addition to our operational portion of this base our goal is to produce mission ready pilots for the fleet,” says Wilson. He says the ATC generally has 160 officers at any given time. Pilots-in-training must complete several hours of classroom and simulator training before taking to the skies. You can learn more about the US Coast Guard and Sector Mobile tonight at 6pm for our next Hometown Tour live broadcast.

Bookmark and Share

Saturday, October 31, 2009

Advertise Here at aviationandaircrafts.blogspot.com

A dvertise Here and get A LARGE Available Places Link adds Per Month JUST 25$ Banner add Per Month JUST 50$ Per post add (displaying add af... thumbnail 1 summary

Advertise Here and get A LARGE
Available Places
  • Link adds
    • Per Month JUST 25$
  • Banner add
    • Per Month JUST 50$
  • Per post add (displaying add after every post LIFE-TIME )
    • Per Month JUST 130$
  • Large Rectangle add.(TOP and Bottom)
    • Per Month JUST 100$
Comment to get in contact or directly mail at pcgcheats@gmail.com
Thanks and Best of Luck

Facing losses, US Airways cutting flights, 1,000 jobs

By Linda Loyd In another sign of tough times for airlines... thumbnail 1 summary

By Linda Loyd

In another sign of tough times for airlines, US Airways Group Inc. said today that it would cut about 1,000 jobs next year, end Philadelphia flights to five European cities, and trim 43.8 percent of daily departures from Las Vegas.

"We cannot continue to operate unprofitably forever," US Airways chairman and chief executive officer Doug Parker said in a memo to employees.

The good news: None of the 200 pilots, 150 flight attendants, and 600 airport passenger and ramp service workers to lose their jobs are based at Philadelphia International Airport.

None of the 600 airport positions to be lost is mechanics who work on airplane maintenance. The Federal Aviation Administration earlier this month proposed a $5.4 million fine against the airline for alleged safety and maintenance lapses.

Many of the job cuts will be in Las Vegas, Boston, and New York's LaGuardia airport, said airline spokesman Morgan Durrant.

Struggling to turn a profit, with volatile fuel prices and a slowly improving economy, Philadelphia's dominant airline said it would close crew bases in Boston, New York, and Las Vegas.

It will end all flights to Wichita, Kan., and Colorado Springs, Colo. The net effect of all the changes is fewer options for the flying public.

US Airways employs a total of 4,200 pilots; 6,300 flight attendants, and 11,500 airport, baggage, gate, and grounds workers. It also has 3,400 maintenance employees.

After these changes next year, 99 percent of US Airways flying will be to or from its three hub cities - Charlotte, N.C.; Philadelphia; and Phoenix - and Washington's Reagan National Airport.

The airline is dropping a planned route to Beijing from Philadelphia that already had been delayed from 2009 to March 2010.

It is suspending flights next year between Philadelphia and London Gatwick airport and Birmingham, England; Milan, Italy; Shannon, Ireland; and Stockholm, Sweden. Only London Gatwick was daily, year-round service. The other four were seasonal between May and October. US Airways still has a daily flight from Philadelphia to London Heathrow.

On its East Coast shuttle, US Airways will fly smaller Embraer-190 aircraft between Boston and New York. Flights will continue almost hourly between Philadelphia and Boston.

"While we are beginning to see some improvement in the business environment," Parker said in the employee memo, "we still reported a loss [of $80 million] for the third quarter and are expected to report another large loss for 2009."

US Airways, the smallest of the so-called "legacy" airlines behind Delta, American, United, and Continental, lost $800 million in 2008.

Daily flights from Las Vegas will be cut from 64 to 36 by February because of high fuel prices and "continued weak demand," the airline said.

"US Airways cuts will make it even more difficult to get to Vegas," said analyst Brian McGill of Janney Capital Markets Inc. in a client note.

US Airways has 12 percent of the market - seats and flights - into Las Vegas, which will shrink to 7 percent beginning in March, McGill said.

"The majority of the cuts are likely to come from long-haul cities such as Charlotte and Philadelphia," he wrote.

"We expect the Strip to become more reliant on the less profitable drive-in customer." Visitors who drive are "15 percent less profitable per day than fly-in customers," McGill said. At its peak in March 2007, US Airways had 112 daily flights arriving in Las Vegas.

"These are difficult decisions," Parker said. "They are, however, the right decisions. By focusing on our strengths and eliminating unprofitable flying, we will increase the likelihood of returning US Airways to long-term profitability."

US Airways has 1,950 flight attendants and 1,150 pilots based at Philadelphia International Airport.

Separately, American Airlines announced it would close its Kansas City, Mo., maintenance base and shut, or shrink, five other maintenance stations in San Francisco, Detroit, Minneapolis, St. Louis, and San Jose, Calif. American has cut flights and reduced its aircraft fleet from more than 900 airplanes to about 600

Friday, October 30, 2009

Earn money in a Super Air Way [sponsered]

MAKE MONEY BY SUPER WAY Earn MONEY NOW! make more then 500$ dollars per day or per hours or so on! NOW Earn MONEY NOW! thumbnail 1 summary
MAKE MONEY BY SUPER WAY Earn MONEY NOW!

make more then 500$ dollars per day or per hours or so on! NOW
Earn MONEY NOW!

Friday, October 23, 2009

LIFE-TIME FREE TRAVEL for baby born on plane

IN Kuala Lumper (AFP) – A baby boy who made a surprise arrival on board an AirAsia flight this week will be given free flights for life wi... thumbnail 1 summary


IN Kuala Lumper (AFP) – A baby boy who made a surprise arrival on board an AirAsia flight this week will be given free flights for life with the budget carrier, as will his mother, the airline said Friday.
AirAsia said 31-year-old passenger Liew Siaw Hsia went into labour on Wednesday's flight from the northern island of Penang to Kuching on Borneo island.
The aircraft made an emergency diversion to the Malaysian capital but the baby arrived just before landing, delivered by a doctor who was on board and who was assisted by the airline's flight attendants.
"The baby was safely delivered when flight AK 6506 was approaching Kuala Lumpur for landing at 2,000 feet," the airline said in a statement, adding that mother and baby were taken to a nearby hospital following touchdown.
"To celebrate this momentous occasion, we decided to present both mother and child with free flights for life," said AirAsia's director of operations Moses Devanayagam after visiting them in hospital.

Bookmark and Share

Wednesday, October 21, 2009

Air Polution By Aircrafts

Air pollution Aviation are the power of present Era. But we don't know that they are one of the main cause of Air pollution. The air we... thumbnail 1 summary
Air pollution
Aviation are the power of present Era. But we don't know that they are one of the main cause of Air pollution. The air we breath contain pollution in which air crafts and airplanes are contributing almost 35% by a scientific research. We enjoy travelling planes and pay a big for them, but we dont know we are buying disease such as cancer, skin infection, skin cancer and such dangerous diseases. Scientist must play a part in reducing this cause. They must increase engine efficiency and make such type of fuel that cause less pollution. Right Now! airplanes are the main source of Communication, transport, and big consumer of OIL. Oil is a lessing day by day and airplane can consume even 1 ton (1000 liters) per flight and you may estimate how expensive and how destructive to our environment,. Engineers and scientist must find out new fuel type like green fuel which reduces these factors and make the aviation save for environment and able us to breath in REALLY clean environment.
Make environment SECURE tip:

We must plant trees and make our environment more green and more healthy for us and our next generation.
Bookmark and Share

Saturday, October 3, 2009

Airport Night Scene Wallpaper

Airport night scene .... Very nice thumbnail 1 summary

Airport night scene .... Very nice
Bookmark and Share

Saturday, September 26, 2009

"I FLY BECAUSE". . . . Some thoughts and talks

" I fly because " some thoughts Why fly? Simple. I'm not happy unless there's some room between me and the ground. ... thumbnail 1 summary
" I fly because " some thoughts


Why fly? Simple. I'm not happy unless there's some room between me and the ground. ~Richard Bach
I fly because it releases my mind from the tyranny of petty things.  ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery
 The air up there in the clouds is very pure and fine, bracing and delicious.  And why shouldn't it be? - it is the same the angels breathe.  ~Mark Twain, "Roughing It"
 You haven't seen a tree until you've seen its shadow from the sky.  ~Amelia Earhart
 How strange is this combination of proximity and separation.  That ground - seconds away - thousands of miles away.  ~Charles A. Lindbergh
 There is an art, or rather a knack to flying.  The knack lies in learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss.


Spread your wings and let the fairy in you fly! ~Author Unknown
  ~Douglas Adams, Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy
 There are only two emotions in a plane:  boredom and terror.  ~Orson Welles
Both optimists and pessimists contribute to our society.  The optimist invents the airplane and the
pessimist the parachute.  ~Gil Stern
Flight is the only truly new sensation than men have achieved in modern history.  ~James Dickey
O! for a horse with wings!  ~William Shakespeare, Cymbeline
The butterfly is a flying flower...  ~Ponce Denis Écouchard Lebrun
More than anything else the sensation is one of perfect peace mingled with an excitement that strains every nerve to the utmost, if you can conceive of such a combination.  ~Wilbur Wright
The modern airplane creates a new geographical dimension.


He who would learn to fly one day must first learn to stand and walk and run and climb and dance; one cannot fly into flying. ~Friedrich Nietzsche
  A navigable ocean of air blankets the whole surface of the globe.  There are no distant places any longer:  the world is small and the world is one.  ~Wendell Willkie
Once you have learned to fly your plane, it is far less fatiguing to fly than it is to drive a car.  You don't have to watch every second for cats, dogs, children, lights, road signs, ladies with baby carriages and citizens who drive out in the middle of the block against the lights.... Nobody who has not been up in the sky on a glorious morning can possibly imagine the way a pilot feels in free heaven.  ~William T. Piper
Lovers of air travel find it exhilarating to hang poised between the illusion of immortality and the fact of death.  ~Alexander Chase, "Perspectives," 1966
Flying without feathers is not easy; my wings have no feathers.


I Gave the Tickets to YOU~Bald Bob of Bakersfield
  ~Titus Maccius Plautus
Within all of us is a varying amount of space lint and star dust, the residue from our creation.  Most are too busy to notice it, and it is stronger in some than others.  It is strongest in those of us who fly and is responsible for an unconscious, subtle desire to slip into some wings and try for the elusive boundaries of our origin.  ~K.O. Eckland, "Footprints On Clouds"
He who would learn to fly one day must first learn to stand and walk and run and climb and dance; one cannot fly into flying.  ~Friedrich Nietzsche
The bluebird carries the sky on his back.  ~Henry David Thoreau
If God had really intended men to fly, he'd make it easier to get to the airport.  ~George Winters

The engine is the heart of an airplane, but the pilot is its soul.


The Wright Brothers created the single greatest cultural force since the invention of writing. The airplane became the first World Wide Web, bringing people, languages, ideas, and values together. ~Bill Gates
  ~Walter Raleigh
Angels can fly because they carry no burdens.  ~Quoted in The Angels' Little Instruction Book by Eileen Elias Freeman, 1994
Whenever we safely land in a plane, we promise God a little something.  ~Mignon McLaughlin, The Neurotic's Notebook, 1960
Pilots are a rare kind of human.  They leave the ordinary surface of the word, to purify their soul in the sky, and they come down to earth, only after receiving the communion of the infinite.  ~Jose Maria Velasco Ibarra
Thank God men cannot fly, and lay waste the sky as well as the earth.  ~Henry David Thoreau
he desire to reach for the sky runs deep in our human psyche.  ~Cesar Pelli
Why fly?  Simple.  I'm not happy unless there's some room between me and the ground.  ~Richard Bach
I never liked riding in helicopters because there's a fair probability that the bottom part will get going around as fast as the top part.


The modern airplane creates a new geographical dimension. A navigable ocean of air blankets the whole surface of the globe. There are no distant places any longer: the world is small and the world is one. ~Wendell Willkie
  ~John Wittenborn
In the space age, man will be able to go around the world in two hours - one hour for flying and one hour to get to the airport.  ~Neil McElroy
When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return.  ~Leonardo Da Vinci  (Thanks, Tommy)
The Wright Brothers created the single greatest cultural force since the invention of writing.  The airplane became the first World Wide Web, bringing people, languages, ideas, and values together.  ~Bill Gates
Given angel's wings, where might you fly?
In what sweet heaven might you find your love?
Unwilling to be bound, where might you move,
Lost between the wonder and the why?...
~Nicholas Gordon, poemsforfree.


Flying without feathers is not easy; my wings have no feathers. ~Titus Maccius Plautus
com
Bicycling is the nearest approximation I know to the flight of birds.  The airplane simply carries a man on its back like an obedient Pegasus; it gives him no wings of his own.  ~Louis J. Helle, Jr., Spring in Washington
When you think about flying, it's nuts really.  Here you are at about 40,000 feet, screaming along at 700 miles an hour and you're sitting there drinking Diet Pepsi and eating peanuts.  It just doesn't make any sense.  ~David Letterman
I feel about airplanes the way I feel about diets. It seems to me that they are wonderful things for other people to go on.  ~Jean Kerr, "Mirror, Mirror, on the Wall," The Snake Has All the Lines, 1958

I pick the prettiest part of the sky and I melt into the wing and then into the air, till I'm just soul on a sunbeam.


The engine is the heart of an airplane, but the pilot is its soul. ~Walter Raleigh
  ~Richard Bach
If black boxes survive air crashes, why don't they make the whole plane out of that stuff?  ~George Carlin
Those who gave away their wings are sad not to see them fly.  ~Antonio Porchia, Voces, 1943, translated from Spanish by W.S. Merwin
I think it is a pity to lose the romantic side of flying and simply to accept it as a common means of transport....  ~Amy Johnson
My soul is in the sky.  ~William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night's Dream
I always thought that my airplane conveyed a silent sermon.  To the earthbound observer, its silhouette was the shape of the cross on which Jesus was crucified.  ~E.R. Trimble
The reason angels can fly is because they take themselves lightly.  ~G.K. Chesterton, "Orthodoxy"
Now I know why they tell you to put your head between your knees on crash landings.


O! for a horse with wings! ~William Shakespeare, Cymbeline
  You think you're going to kiss your ass good-bye.  ~Terry Hanson
There is just one thing I can promise you about the outer-space program - your tax-dollar will go further.  ~Werner von Braun
Aerodynamically the bumblebee shouldn't be able to fly, but the bumblebee doesn't know that so it goes on flying anyway.  ~Mary Kay Ash
Spread your wings and let the fairy in you fly!  ~Author Unknown
If happy little bluebirds fly beyond the rainbow, why oh why can't I?  ~E.Y. Harburg
The desire to fly is an idea handed down to us by our ancestors who, in their grueling travels across trackless lands in prehistoric times, looked enviously on the birds soaring freely through space, at full speed, above all obstacles, on the infinite highway of the air.  ~Wilbur Wright

Bookmark and Share

Monday, September 14, 2009

Andhra Pradesh CM YSR Reddy dead in chopper crash CBI investigation

Hyderabad, Sept 12 (PTI) The CBI today began its probe into the helicopter crash that killed former Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister Y S Rajas... thumbnail 1 summary
Hyderabad, Sept 12 (PTI) The CBI today began its probe into the helicopter crash that killed former Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister Y S Rajasekhara Reddy and four other persons with a team visiting the site in Nallamala forests.

"A ten-member CBI team has begun on-site investigations at Nallamala forest range," Kurnool District Superintendent of Police Ch Srikant told PTI over phone.

The multi-disciplinary investigation team (MDIT) headed by agency's Deputy Inspector General V V Lakshmi Narayana visited Pavuralagutta hills in Kurnool district after formally taking over the case yesterday, he said.

The team comprising officers from the Indian Air Force, the Directorate General of Civil Aviation and Superintendent of Police of CBI in Visakhapatnam Nageswara Rao will also scrutinise the log details of the Air Traffic Control in Hyderabad and Chennai.
Bookmark and Share

Saturday, September 12, 2009

New college students explore careers in aviation

Students starting out at Birmingham Southern College (BSC) without a declared major had a hands-on introduction to opportunities in the fiel... thumbnail 1 summary
Students starting out at Birmingham Southern College (BSC) without a declared major had a hands-on introduction to opportunities in the field of aviation Aug. 31 at Shelby County Airport in Alabaster, Ala.
The airport and members of the Shelby County Aviation Association (SCAA) hosted an event for incoming freshman that included presentations about what aviation has to offer and hands-on exposure to a variety of aircraft. AOPA provided SCAA members with information to inform the students about careers in aviation, including becoming a pilot, meteorology, airport operations, and aeronautical engineering. Students were treated to one-on-one discussions about aircraft on the flight line, including gliders, low-wing airplanes, high-wing airplanes, and tail-draggers.
“The opportunity to sit in the cockpit and have all their questions answered was a hit, and the questions did flow,” said Rick Kilgore, SCAA president and the AOPA Airport Support Network volunteer for Shelby County Airport. “The most common reaction was, ‘This is so cool!’”
BSC professors David J. Smith and Matt S. Mielke brought the undeclared-major freshman to the airport, and more than 10 airport-based pilots donated their time to help out, Kilgore said. Three FAA Safety Team (FAASTeam) representatives also participated in the event.
Airport manager Terry Franklin welcomed the students, advisers, and SCAA pilots to the event, and Kilgore began the sessions with an overview of the economic impact of the airport on the area and the financial impact aviation has on the state of Alabama. This was followed by presentations by Ladde Mayer on aerodynamics, Mark Rose on the National Weather Service, Lt. Col. Scott Grant on military aviation careers, and a final presentation by Sanders Flight Training Center on opportunities to become a pilot.
Ladde Mayer gave a presentation about aerodynamics at a Birmingham Southern College aviation career event for incoming freshmen.Ladde Mayer gave a presentation about aerodynamics at a Birmingham Southern College aviation career event for incoming freshmen.
“Having the weather service, an engineer, a military pilot and a number of general aviation pilots gave the students an eye-opener of an experience in the significant number of opportunities available to students today in aviation,” Kilgore said.
At the end of the day, students were given the opportunity to have a seat in one of the Super 300 King Airs based at the airport. The pilot, Byron Farr, also a SCAA member and Shelby County-based pilot, discussed corporate flying with the students. 
Bookmark and Share

Tuesday, August 25, 2009

One Minute Stop Lane At airports

Airport one minute stop or drop lane for the passengers. This is used to avoid traffic blockage and cannot be used for parking or stay purp... thumbnail 1 summary

Airport one minute stop or drop lane for the passengers. This is used to avoid traffic blockage and cannot be used for parking or stay purpose. Just drop the luggage and passenger and get away otherwise you will face a fine from Police. So beware at one minute stop lane at airports.
Bookmark and Share

Sunday, August 23, 2009

Most expensive military aircrafts

B2 - Spirit: A heavy bomber made by USA, only 21 units were made and now only 20 remains as one crashed in 2008. B-2 Spirit is top our l... thumbnail 1 summary

B2 - Spirit:

A heavy bomber made by USA, only 21 units were made and now only 20 remains as one crashed in 2008. B-2 Spirit is top our list of most expensive as each unit cost around $2.4 billion, yeah quite an expensive bomber plane, but if you check the features of this aircraft, you will surely say that this aircraft is worthy of such a price tag. Let us give you brief overview of its capabilities,
  1. the THING is hard to detect via infrared,
  2. acoustic, electromagnetic,
  3. visual or radar signals
  4. virtualy invisible.
Thus giving it the stealth and nice capability making it able to attack targets with less fear of retaliation and more powerful and unbeatable military aircrafts. Its a new era of aviation technology

Test Video of B2 Spirit has also published

Bookmark and Share